RHS Podcast & Video Archive

Podcast

Dr Andrew Arsan

Arab political thought and the problem of empire, c.1856-1919

RHS Lecture
7 February 2020

Click here to listen to the lecture. Details of the event, with an abstract, are available here.

 

Podcast

Professor Margot Finn

Material Turns in British History III: Collecting: Colonial Bombay, Basra, Baghdad and the Enlightenment Museum

RHS Presidential Address
6 December 2019

Click here to listen to the lecture. Details of the event, with an abstract, are available here.

 

Podcast

Professor Penny Roberts

Truth and Justice during the French Religious Wars

RHS Lecture
20 September 2019

Click here to listen to the lecture. An abstract of the event is available here.

 

Podcast

Dr Sujit Sivasundaram

Waves Across the South: Monarchs, Travellers and Empire in the Pacific

RHS Prothero Lecture
5 July 2019

Click here to listen to the lecture. An abstract is available here.

 

Podcast

Professor Mary Vincent

The ‘Martyrdom of Things’: Iconoclasm and its Meanings in the Spanish Civil War

RHS Public Lecture
10 May 2019

Click here to listen to the lecture. An abstract is available here.

 

Podcast

Professor Lynn Abrams

Pursuing autonomy: self-help and self fashioning amongst women in post-war Britain’.

RHS Lecture
11 May 2018

A podcast of Prof. Abrams’ lecture is available here.

Abstract. The 1960s has been dubbed the ‘do-it-yourself decade’. This was the era when the women of the so-called ‘transition generation’ began to discover the gap between their expectations and the realities of their lives and in most cases took it upon themselves to fill that gap with autonomous activity rather than looking to existing organisations or the state to act on their behalf. This lecture examines the place of do-it-yourself women’s organisations – the National Housewives’ Register, National Childbirth Trust and Pre-School Playgroups Association – in the emerging history of postwar womanhood in the United Kingdom and seeks to rescue them from the condescension of those who have regarded them as not being sufficiently critical of gender relations and thus not part of the postwar feminist narrative. I argue that these organisations which emerged at a grass roots level from women’s dissatisfaction and frustration, came to offer thousands the opportunity for self-development, self confidence and independence.

 

Lecture Video

Professor Diana Paton

Mary Williamson’s Letter, or: Seeing Women & Sisters in the Archives of Atlantic Slavery

RHS Lecture
9 February 2018

Watch the lecture and read Prof. Paton’s abstract below.

“I was a few years back a slave on your property of Houton Tower, and as a Brown woman was fancied by a Mr Tumoning unto who Mr Thomas James sold me.” Thus begins Mary Williamson’s letter, which for decades sat unexamined in an attic in Scotland until a history student became interested in her family’s papers, and showed it to Diana Paton. In this lecture, Paton will use the letter to reflect on the history and historiography of ‘Brown’ women like Mary Williamson in Jamaica and other Atlantic slave societies. Mary Williamson’s letter offers a rare perspective on the sexual encounters between white men and Brown women that were pervasive in Atlantic slave societies. Yet its primary focus is on the greater importance of ties of place and family—particularly of relations between sisters—in a context in which the ‘severity’ of slavery was increasing. Mary Williamson’s letter is a single and thus-far not formally archived trace in a broader archive of Atlantic slavery dominated by material left by slaveholders and government officials. Paton asks what the possibilities and limits of such a document may be for generating knowledge about the lives and experiences of those who were born into slavery.