RHS News

Funded Book Workshops, for mid-career historians, 2024-25 – Call now open

The Society now invites applications for its Funded Book Workshops programme, 2024-25. Funded Book Workshops support historians currently writing their second or third monograph to bring together up to six specialist readers for a day to discuss a manuscript in detail, prior to its completion and submission to a publisher.

Established in 2023, Workshops support mid-career historians in the writing and development of a monograph. The Society looks to make two awards for the next round of Workshops to be held in the academic year 2024-25.

Each award provides up to £2000 to an author to host a day-long book workshop to consider a project and monograph text in detail. Funds may be spent to invite up to six scholars (based in the UK or European Union) to attend the workshop, and is intended to cover travel, hospitality and overnight accommodation where required. Where convenient, the Society welcomes applications to hold workshops at its office at University College London.

Further information on the programme is available here.

The closing date for applications for this round is Friday 9 August 2024 and we seek to inform successful applicants by late September.

Applications for this current round of Funded Book Workshops may be made vis the Society’s application platform.

In its first year, Workshops were awarded in 2023-24 to:

  • Jennifer Aston (Northumbria University) for her project: ‘For Wives Alone’: Deserted Wives and Economic Divorce in Nineteenth Century England and Wales
  • Tim Grady (University of Chester) for his project: ‘The Unwelcome Gravediggers’: War, Memory and the Unmaking of British-German Relations

Questions relating to this call may be sent to administration@royalhistsoc.org.

Details of other Research Funding opportunities from the Society are available here.

 

Society submits response to REF2029 Open Access Consultation

The Royal Historical Society has today submitted a response to the Research Excellence Framework 2029 open access consultation.

The consultation, launched in March 2024, proposes the extension of open access requirements for eligible publications for REF2029. The proposals relate both to journal articles and, now, what REF terms ‘longform’ publications, principally monographs, edited collections, book chapters and scholarly editions. These formats are a very significant part of History, and Humanities publishing, and comprised 55% of publication submissions for History for the previous REF (2021).

  • The Royal Historical Society’s statement on the consultation is available here. This Society’s response draws on answers provided by RHS members to a Survey (conducted in May 2024) on attitudes to open access and the REF more widely.
  • Further information on the REF2029 OA proposals is available here; these were the subject of a Society blog post published in March.

In its response to the consultation, the Society expresses concern about the scale and pace of the proposals, especially with regard to mandatory OA publication of books for which the necessary infrastructure, resources and financial support are absent.

The Society believes REF’s OA proposals for book publishing go too far, too fast. We are concerned that mandating these proposals will alienate humanities academics, and their support networks, and risks delegitimising REF as a measure and reward of research excellence in the opinion of those it seeks to assess.

We therefore recommend that REF’s OA proposals for books are not mandated for the next research exercise; rather the next cycle is used to explore sustainable future models that increase access to high-quality research.

The closing date for responses to the REF OA proposals is Monday 17 June 2024.


IMAGE HEADER: Credit: Natalie_ iStock

 

Early Career Historians of Colour: Two Mentoring and Workshop Programmes, for summer / autumn 2024

The Royal Historical Society is pleased to announce calls from early career historians of colour for two mentoring and workshop programmes running in the summer / autumn of 2024. These programmes will provide support in the following two areas of early academic career development:

Applications to both programmes are now open. Both programmes include one-to-one mentoring (online) with an academic historian at a later career stage, and a concluding group workshop (online) for all participants in the programme.

Further details of both programmes are provided below.


Applying for an Academic Job in History

Closing date 19 July 2024

This is a bespoke workshop programme hosted by the Royal Historical Society for early career historians of colour. Now in its fourth year, the programme brings together early career historians with more senior colleagues to discuss making applications for academic careers in History in UK Higher Education.

The event combines one-to-one mentoring (online, to be held by arrangement between 19 August and 20 September 2024), followed by a group Workshop to be held online at 2pm on Friday 27 September 2024.

In order to tailor our support of participants during this event, we will be limiting the number of attendees to 25 in the first instance. This programme is being led, on behalf of the Society’s Council, by Dr Adam Budd, RHS Secretary for Education.

Further information on this programme, and how to apply is available here.

The closing date for applications is: Friday 19 July 2024.


Writing and Publishing First Academic Articles in History

Closing date 17 June 2024

This programme offers guidance to early career historians of colour who are engaged in writing one of the first articles of their academic career.

Invitations are invited from early career historians of colour who are in the process of preparing a historical research article for publication in an academic journal. Applicants may have already published one article / book chapter / literature review and still be eligible to apply for the programme. Successful applicants must be able to provide mentors with a draft article in line with the timetable of the programme. 

The event combines one-to-one mentoring (online, to be held by arrangement between 14 October and 14 November 2024), followed by a group Workshop for all participants, to be held online at 2pm on Friday 15 November 2024.

In order to tailor our support of participants during this event, we will be limiting the number of attendees to 10 early career historians of colour. This programme is being led, on behalf of the Society’s Council, by Dr Rebekah Lee.

Further information on this programme, and how to apply is available here.

The closing date for applications is: Monday 17 June 2024.


Questions regarding these two mentoring and workshop programmes may be sent to: administration@royalhistsoc.org.

 

Recordings of Corinne Fowler’s recent RHS lecture now available

The recording of Corinne Fowlers’s recent RHS Sponsored Lecture is now available. Corinne’s lecture discussed her new book, Our Island Stories: Country Walks Through Colonial Britain (May 2024) and the colonial connections and legacies found when walking the British countryside.

Corinne’s lecture, ‘Country Walks in Colonial Britain’, was given at Brunel University, on Thursday 23 May as part of the Society’s Visit to historians at Brunel.

 

Listen to the Lecture

 

Corinne is Professor of Colonialism and Heritage at the University of Leicester

You can also watch and listen to this, and many other, Society lectures and panel discussions via the RHS Events Archive.


Join us next for the Society’s 2024 Prothero Lecture

In this year’s RHS Prothero Lecture, Peter Frankopan (Professor of Global History at the University of Oxford) will ask what is global history; should historians think globally – and is it even possible to do so? How does macro-history fit alongside microhistories and regional and periodic specialisations; and what do these questions mean for the teaching of history at school and university?

In a wide-ranging lecture that will include examples from Mesopotamia to the Indus Valley, from Mesoamerica and the Classic Maya period to the ages of the Silk Roads, Professor Frankopan will talk about the problems of traditional periodisation and regionalisation and show how global history can be instructive and helpful from teaching at primary school level to high-level academic research to public history.

The RHS Prothero Lecture is followed, from 8.00pm, by the Society’s Annual Summer Party at Mary Ward House, London. The Society’s annual summer party is an opportunity for historians to meet together and to speak with members of the Society’s Council. All lecture attendees are warmly welcome to join us for the party after the Prothero Lecture.

6.30pm BST, Wednesday 3 July 2024 in person, at Mary Ward House, London.
Royal Historical Society Prothero Lecture, 2024: ‘On the Challenges and Purposes of Global History’
Speaker: Peter Frankopan (Oxford)
Booking for in-person and online attendance for this Lecture is now available.

 

 

Current Research Funding Calls from Royal Historical Society

Allocation of research funding is central to the Society’s work of supporting historians and historical research.

In 2023 the Society has awarded £110,085 in funding to historians through open competitions, generously assisted by partner organisations and donors. In 2023-24, the Society is continuing to develop and extend its funding programmes for historians, within and outside Higher Education, and at at all career stages.

Full details of the Society’s Research Funding programmes are available here. The Society currently invites applications for the following three schemes with closing dates of Friday 7 June 2024 and 6 September 2024. For further information on each programme, eligibility and how to apply please follow the links below.

  • Postgraduate Research Support Grants – for History students (who are Postgraduate Members of the Royal Historical Society), currently studying for a Masters degree or PhD. Awards of either £500 or £1000 to support specified research activities. Next closing date for applications: Friday 7 June 2024.
  • Early Career Research Support Grants – for early career historians (historians who are within 5 years of having submitted their PhD in a historical subject). Applicants must also be members of the Royal Historical Society. Awards of either £500 or £1000 to support specified research activities. Next closing date for applications: Friday 7 June 2024.
  • Masters’ Scholarships – eight grants of £5,000 each to students from groups currently underrepresented in History in UK Higher Education, who seek to study for a Masters’ degree in History, in the academic year 2024-25. Closing date for Stage One applications: Sunday 23 June 2024.
  • Martin Lynn Scholarships in African History – to assist a postgraduate researcher of African history. The Scholarship is worth £1,500 and is open to Postgraduate Members of the Royal Historical Society. Next closing date for applications: Friday 6 September 2024.

Applicants for Royal Historical Society funding must be members of the Society, with exceptions for several Postgraduate grants. To find out how to become a Fellow, Associate Fellow, Member or Postgraduate Member, please see our Join Us page.

Enquiries concerning these, and other RHS Research Funding programmes, please contact: administration@royalhistsoc.org.


HEADER IMAGE: Design for a Fruit Plate, anonymous, French, 19th century, Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, public domain

 

First Academic Articles programme for Early Career Historians of Colour

Applications are now invited for the Society’s new mentoring and workshop programme: ‘First Academic Articles programme for Early Career Historians of Colour’.

The purpose of this programme is to provide guidance to early career historians of colour who are engaged in writing one of the first articles of their academic career. This programme is one of several run by the Society for early career historians of colour. The call for the Society’s second annual programme, ‘On CV Writing and Applying for an Academic Job’, will be announced later in the year.

Successful applicants will work with mentors to develop an academic article  (July-October) and then taken part on a workshop on journal publishing in November 2024. ‘First Academic Articles’ will be limited to 10 participants and is being led, on behalf of the Society’s Council, by Dr Rebekah Lee.

Invitations are invited from early career historians of colour who are in the process of preparing a historical research article for publication in an academic journal. Applicants may have already published one article / book chapter / literature review and still be eligible to apply for the programme. Successful applicants must be able to provide mentors with a draft article in line with the timetable of the programme. 

For more on the programme and how to apply please see here. Applications close on Monday 17 June 2024

Questions regarding this mentoring and workshop programme may be sent to: administration@royalhistsoc.org.

 

Society visits historians at Brunel University

On Thursday 23 May, members of the Society’s Council were in Uxbridge to meet with historians and senior managers at Brunel University.

The day brought together teaching staff, researchers and students, along with members of the university’s senior management. Panels considered the work of historians at Brunel, the state of History within UK higher education, and the Society’s engagement with politicians to raise concerns about cuts and closures in departments. A session with RHS Councillors also discussed the role and work of the Royal Historical Society, and how the Society can best respond to the needs of historians, of all kinds, at the regional and national level.

The RHS Visit to Brunel closed with a public lecture, ‘Country Walks in Colonial Britain’, given by Corinne Fowler (University of Leicester). In this lecture Corinne discussed her new book, Our Island Stories: Country Walks Through Colonial Britain (May 2024) and the colonial connections and legacies found when walking the British countryside.

We are very grateful to historians at Brunel University for hosting the Visit, and especially Dr Alison Carol and Dr Inge Dornan for organising the day. We are also very grateful to those from across the university who took part in the panel discussions, and to the Vice Chancellor and Pro Vice Chancellor Research for meeting with the Council to discuss History at Brunel. And special thanks to Professor Corinne Fowler for her excellent guest lecture which formed part of the 2024 Brunel Research Festival (13-31 May).

 

Call now open for Masters’ Scholarships, 2024-25

The Royal Historical Society is pleased to announce its call for applications for its Masters’ Scholarships programme 2024-25.

RHS Masters’ Scholarships provide financial support to students from groups currently underrepresented in academic History. Each Scholarship is worth £5,000.

This year the Society seeks to award eight scholarships to students who will begin a Masters’ degree in History (full or part-time) at a UK university from the start of the next academic year. The Society thanks the Past & Present Society and the Scouloudi Foundation for their generous support of this year’s awards.

The programme, established in 2022, seeks to actively address underrepresentation within the discipline, and enable Black and Asian students, along with those of other minorities, to consider academic research in History.

By supporting Masters’ students the programme focuses on a key early stage in the academic training of future researchers. With these Scholarships, we seek to support students who are without the financial means to study for a Masters’ in History. By doing so, we hope to improve the educational experience of early career historians engaged in a further degree.

Further details of the programme, the eligibility requirements and closing dates for applications are available here.

 

Recordings of Julia Laite’s recent RHS lecture now available

The recording of Julia Laite’s recent RHS Lecture is now available. Julia’s lecture explores the ways of mapping and knowing Newfoundland — official and unofficial, colonial and Indigenous — in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The lecture reconsiders the place of this ‘unknown’ island and its difficult history within the British Empire.

Julia’s lecture, ‘Possible Maps: Ways of Knowing and Unknowing at the Edge of Empire (Newfoundland c. 1763-1829)’, was given at Mary Ward House, London, on Friday 3 May.

Listen to the Lecture

 

Julia is Professor of Modern History at Birkbeck, University of London

You can also watch and listen to this, and many other, Society lectures and panel discussions via the RHS Events Archive.

 


Join us next for the Society’s 2024 Prothero Lecture

 

 

In this year’s RHS Prothero Lecture, Peter Frankopan (Professor of Global History at the University of Oxford) will ask what is global history; should historians think globally – and is it even possible to do so? How does macro-history fit alongside microhistories and regional and periodic specialisations; and what do these questions mean for the teaching of history at school and university?

In a wide-ranging lecture that will include examples from Mesopotamia to the Indus Valley, from Mesoamerica and the Classic Maya period to the ages of the Silk Roads, Professor Frankopan will talk about the problems of traditional periodisation and regionalisation and show how global history can be instructive and helpful from teaching at primary school level to high-level academic research to public history.


The RHS Prothero Lecture is followed, from 8.00pm, by the Society’s Annual Summer Party at Mary Ward House, London. The Society’s annual summer party is an opportunity for historians to meet together and to speak with members of the Society’s Council. All lecture attendees are warmly welcome to join us for the party after the Prothero Lecture.


6.30pm BST, Wednesday 3 July 2024 in person, at Mary Ward House, London.
Royal Historical Society Prothero Lecture, 2024: ‘On the Challenges and Purposes of Global History’
Speaker: Peter Frankopan (Oxford)
Booking for in-person and online attendance for this Lecture is now available.

 

Society elects 281 new Fellows, Associate Fellows, Members and Postgraduate Members

At its latest meeting on 3 May 2024, the RHS Council elected 72 Fellows, 57 Associate Fellows, 60 Members and 92 Postgraduate Members, a total of 281 people newly associated with the Society, from today.

The majority of the new Fellows hold academic appointments at universities, specialising in a very wide range of fields; but also include museum curators, archivists, heritage consultants, and independent researchers and writers. The Society is an international community of historians and our latest intake includes Fellows from sixteen countries: Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and United States.

The new Associate Fellows include not only early career historians in higher education but also historians with professional and private research interests drawn from heritage, learned societies, libraries and archives, teaching, and public and community history.

The new Members have a similarly wide range of historical interests, and include individuals working in universities, culture and heritage, education, the civil service and broadcasting – together with independent and community historians and genealogists.

Our new Postgraduate Members are studying for higher degrees in History, or related subjects, at 60 different universities in the UK, China, Germany, India, Ireland, the Netherlands, Spain, Taiwan and the United States.

All those newly elected to the Fellowship and Membership bring a valuable range of expertise and experience to the Society.

New Fellows and Members are elected at regular intervals through the year. The current application round is open and runs to 27 May 2024 with the next closing date of 12 August 2024. Further details on RHS Fellowship and Membership categories (Fellow, Associate Fellow, Member and Postgraduate Member); benefits of membership; deadlines for applications throughout 2024; and how to apply, are available here.

 

New Fellows, elected May 2024

  • Benjamin Armstrong
  • Duncan Anderson
  • Gordon Bates
  • Hannah Boston
  • Jeff Bowersox
  • Francesco Bozzi
  • Timothy Brain
  • Patrick Bray
  • Sarah Brazil
  • Stephan Bruhn
  • Elias Buchetmann
  • Bryony Coombs
  • Fred Cooper
  • Tony Cowan
  • Andrew Crawley
  • Erik de Lange
  • Rachel Delman
  • Myriam-Isabelle Ducrocq
  • Matthew Daniel Eddy
  • Danny  Evans
  • Suzanne Fagence Cooper
  • Daniel  Feather
  • Pelayo Fernández García
  • George Ferzoco
  • Craig Griffiths
  • Arthur Gullachsen
  • Catherine Hanley
  • Eureka Henrich
  • Adrian Hilton
  • Niamh Howlin
  • Richard Huscroft
  • Chloe Ireton
  • Jean-Michel Johnston
  • Daniel  Kaszeta
  • Yasmin Khan
  • Amanda Lanzillo
  • Maximilian Lau
  • Michael Leggiere
  • Alastair Lockhart
  • Zhouxiang Lu
  • Tosca Lynch
  • Kirsten Macfarlane
  • Daniel Mandur Thomaz
  • Clement Masakure
  • Martha McGill
  • Alessia Meneghin
  • Daniele Miano
  • Alex Middleton
  • Stephen Milner
  • Georgina Mary Montgomery
  • Jessica Moody
  • Francesco Morriello
  • Laurence Mussio
  • Delfi Nieto-Isabel
  • Niall Oddy
  • Annebella Pollen
  • Jason Price
  • Rebecca Probert
  • Matthew Reeve
  • Elizabeth Roberts-Pedersen
  • Gwen Seabourne
  • Kate Strasdin
  • Dan Taylor
  • Paul Thomas
  • Liz Tregenza
  • Jim van der Meulen
  • Brian Varian
  • Kate Vigurs
  • Tiffany Watt Smith
  • Hope Williard
  • James  Wilson
  • Marcus Wuest

New Associate Fellows, elected May 2024

  • David Ashton
  • Polly Bird
  • James Brocklesby
  • Guy Bud
  • Erica Canela
  • Gavin Chiu
  • Silvia Cinnella Della Porta
  • Daniel  Clinkman
  • Rachel Dishington
  • Sarah Dixon Smith
  • Paul Finegan
  • Adam Frost
  • John Joseph Gallagher
  • Elizabeth Goodwin
  • Zachris Haaparinne
  • Nitin Hadap
  • Paul Hamilton
  • Brittany Hanlon
  • Jack Hayes
  • Zoe Hendon
  • Linsey Hunter
  • Li Jiang
  • Philip John
  • Daniel Johnson
  • Elizabeth Jones
  • Alice Kinghorn
  • Aileen Lichtenstein
  • Robin Lucas
  • Cathleen Mair
  • Peter McDonald
  • Ciara Molloy
  • Kellie Moss
  • Ellie Munro
  • Steve Ngo
  • Neil O’Docherty
  • Femi Owolade
  • Joanna Phillips
  • Catherine Phipps
  • Chelsea Reutcke
  • Joshua Rushton
  • Amy Saunders
  • Saptarshi Sengupta
  • Olasupo Shasore
  • Mark William Shearwood
  • Chris Shoop-Worrall
  • Timothy Slonosky
  • Samuel Teague
  • Takao Terui
  • Jane Thick
  • Connie Thomas
  • Kate Tilson
  • Charlotte Tomlinson
  • George Townsend
  • Benjamin Turnbull
  • Jessica Venner
  • Emily Vincent
  • Bo Yan
  • Robert Andrew Yee
  • Jinming Yi

New Members, elected May 2024

  • Ramy Abaker
  • Judith Anderson
  • Thomas Barber
  • Geof Bassford
  • Nwakasi Belisle-Nweke
  • Alexandre Berard
  • Amber Blackburn
  • Roisin Blackmore
  • Tara Bradford
  • Mark Brandon
  • Perry Brown
  • David Chalmers
  • Donald Clark
  • Ryan Cudworth
  • Paul Duncanson
  • Theresa Dunthorne
  • Owain Franks
  • Elizabeth Goodwin
  • Lloyd Griffiths
  • Boris Habric
  • Stuart Hall
  • Douglas Hamilton
  • Samridh Joshi
  • Chad Jude
  • Thomas Kelley
  • Elspeth King
  • Alan Kunna
  • Edward Leane
  • Chan Io Lei
  • Victoria Lister
  • Peter Littke
  • Rachel Martin
  • Jason McArthur
  • Amy McElroy
  • Mercedez Mendy
  • Niels Noordstar
  • Ashley Pegler
  • Shona  Penfold
  • Lee Porter
  • Pranav Prakash
  • Rhys Prosser
  • Samuel Reeve
  • Richard Reger
  • Molly Reid
  • Jan Robinson
  • Owen Rutherford
  • Shona Rutherford-Edge
  • Sharada Sampathkumar
  • Christian Say
  • Anne Mary Shaju
  • Imam Daniel Sihombing
  • Edward Skeel
  • Neil. Smith
  • J. Soames
  • Derek Turner
  • Gregory Tysall
  • Carol Whatling
  • Ben Wheeler
  • Martin  Whincup
  • Charles Wytrychowski IV

New Postgraduate Members, elected May 2024

  • James Adams
  • Paul Aitchison
  • Bushra Alhuzili
  • Emma Arthur
  • Christopher Barnes
  • Lucy Barratt
  • Sean Barrett
  • Emma Bashforth
  • Lucy Beall Lott
  • Meghmala Bhattacharya
  • Jessica Bonfils
  • Howard Bowen
  • Joe Broderick
  • KatilynBrown
  • Kathryn Bruce
  • Nicole Burnett
  • James Burns
  • Finn Cadell
  • Isla Cartney
  • Chloe Challender
  • Daisy Chinghoihkim
  • Sarah Cooley
  • Thomas Cripps
  • Lily Davis
  • Christopher Day
  • Ali Din Din
  • Olivia Dunderdale
  • Simon Edwards
  • María Fernández-Portaencasa
  • Cameron Flint
  • Shushun Gao
  • Ariel Giuliano
  • Molly Groarke
  • Faiq Habash
  • Trent Harron
  • Rachael Haslam
  • Myya Helm
  • Jane Hibbert-Nicolov
  • Rosalind Hodgson
  • Isabelle Hollingdale
  • Frederick Hyde
  • Kshitij Jain
  • Joanne Kenyon
  • Michelle Kiessling
  • Aymeric Lamy
  • Peihang Li
  • Diane Elizabeth Huntington  Loring
  • Aoife Maher
  • Rebecca Maitland
  • Tatenda Mashanda
  • David McBride
  • Hannah Lucy McCullough
  • Eleanor McDonald-Dick
  • Alice McKimm
  • Chris McNulty
  • Joshua Melen
  • Michelle Michel
  • Benhilda Mlambo
  • Abraham Murad
  • Nicole Musson
  • Christopher Owen-Smith
  • Yuxi Pan
  • Cody Parker
  • Florian Probst
  • Prapya Putatunda
  • Richard Pym CBE
  • Bala Ambicanadh Raasamsetty
  • Wajid Abbas Rather
  • Adam   Rowles
  • Madiha Zeb Sadiq
  • Heather Sadiq
  • Ruadhan Scrivener-Anderson
  • Aniya Selvadurai
  • Dipanshu Shekhar
  • John Simlett
  • Andrew Simpson
  • Eden Smith
  • Viktoria Maria Sochor
  • Julian Sproule
  • Aaron Stark
  • Maya Sternthal
  • Shiuli Sural
  • Stephen Symchych
  • Lucy Thompson
  • Brittany Thompson
  • Natalia Tomashpolskaia
  • Thomas Tyson
  • Anastasios Vavalis
  • Ching-Ming Wang
  • Zhaoting Justin Wei
  • Arina Zarei
  • Shuai Zhang

 

HEADER IMAGE: Roman alphabet against architectural backgrounds, from G. P. Zanotti’s Il Claustro di San Michele in Bosco di Bologna, Pio Panfili Italian, 1776, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, public domain.