RHS Events Programme, 2021

Friday 5 February 2021 at 6.00 pm

Dr Katrina Navickas
‘The Contested Right of Public Meeting in England from the Bill of Rights to the Public Order Acts’
Virtual lecture


April 2021

RHS Symposium: Bath Spa University
‘Uneven representations of diversity: Public histories in urban and rural contexts’
Bath Spa University


Friday 7 May 2021 at 6.00 pm

Professor Catherine Holmes
‘The Making and Breaking of Kinetic Empire: Mobility, Communication and Political Change in the Eastern Mediterranean, c.950-1100 C.E.’  
Virtual lecture


Friday 2 July 2021 at 6.00 pm

The Prothero Lecture: Professor Robert Frost
‘The Roads Not Taken: Liberty, Sovereignty and the Idea of the Republic in Poland-Lithuania and the British Isles, 1550-1660’
Virtual lecture


Wednesday 21 July 2021 at 2.00 pm

RHS Online Workshop for Early Career Historians

‘Getting Published: a Guide to First Articles and Journal Publishing’
Virtual training event


Friday 23 July 2021 at 5.00 pm

Royal Historical Society Awards, 2021

Ceremony for Publication, Fellowship and Teaching Awards — with the IHR
Virtual awards ceremony


Friday 17 September 2021, 10.00 am to 13.30 pm

The Gerald Aylmer Seminar in conjunction with the IHR and TNA

‘New Ways to Work: Future Directions in Archival and Historical Practice’
Virtual conference


Friday 24 September 2021 at 5.30 pm

Dr Jonathan Saha
‘Accumulations and Cascades: On the Ecological Impact of British Imperialism’
Virtual lecture


Wednesday 13 October 2021

RHS Visit: University of Lincoln
University of Lincoln 


Tuesday 2 November 2021

The Colin Matthew Memorial Lecture for the Public Understanding of History: Professor Ludmilla Jordanova
In co-operation with Gresham College, London
London


Friday 26 November 2021 at 6.00 pm

RHS Presidential Address: Professor Emma Griffin
‘Industrial Revolutions and the Making of the Modern World‘
UCL

 

Thomas Rowlandson cartoon, The Newspaper

News

Here you’ll find the latest news about Royal Historical Society activities. Our Twitter @RoyalHistSoc and blog, Historical Transactions, also provide regular updates. Fellows and Members also receive a regular RHS News Circular.

Information on forthcoming Events, new Publications, and Joining the RHS is available elsewhere on the website. You can also view the latest RHS Newsletter (May 2021), with previous Newsletters (each May and November) available here.

IMAGE: Thomas Rowlandson, ‘The News Paper’ (Oct. 1812), Elisha Whittelsey Collection, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, public doman.

 

Date Headline
03 Aug 2021 Vacancies: Two Officer Roles on RHS Council
Sampler, 1828, detail 27 Jul 2021 282 new Fellows & Members elected to the Society
23 Jul 2021 RHS Awards 2021: winners and runners-up announced
07 Jul 2021 Vacancy: Chief Executive Officer, RHS
17 Jun 2021 UK Survey: teaching and learning history before, during and after the Covid-19 pandemic
Wooden ballot box, Smithsonian Museum 16 Jun 2021 Elections to RHS Council, 2021: nominations invited
16 Jun 2021 New RHS Fellows & Members – elected in May 2021
24 May 2021 RHS statement on the recent closure of UK History departments
RHS Gladstone Prize logo 19 May 2021 RHS Gladstone Book Prize, 2021 shortlist announced
17 May 2021 RHS Whitfield Book Prize, 2021 shortlist announced

 

The Samuel Pepys Award 2021

The Samuel Pepys Award 2021 – Rules

www.pepys-club.org.uk

The Trustees of the Samuel Pepys Award Trust invite submissions for the tenth Samuel Pepys Award, to be presented at the annual Pepys Club dinner on Tuesday 16 November 2021.

The biennial prize of £2,000 is for a book that, in the opinion of the judges, makes the greatest contribution to the understanding of Samuel Pepys, his times or his contemporaries.

 

The first Samuel Pepys Award marked the tercentenary of Pepys’s death in 2003 and was won by Claire Tomalin for her biography, Samuel Pepys: The Unequalled Self.

Subsequent prize winners were:

  • 2005 Frances Harris for Transformations of Love
  • 2007 John Adamson for The Noble Revolt
  • 2009 JD Davies for Pepys’s Navy: Ships, Men and Warfare 1649-1689.
  • 2011 Michael Hunter for Boyle: Between God and Science.
  • 2013 Henry Reece for The Army in Cromwellian England 1649-1660
  • 2015 Paul Slack for The Invention of Improvement: Information and Material Progress in Seventeenth-Century England
  • 2017 John Walter for Covenanting Citizens: The Protestant Oath and Popular Political culture in the English Revolution
  • 2019 David Como for Radical Parliamentarians and the English Civil War

A specially cast medal by Philip Nathan, in memory of Robert Latham, joint editor of the eleven-volume The Diary of Samuel Pepys, will be presented to the winning author.

 

The Rules

  1. Submissions must be made no later than Wednesday 30 June 2021.
  2. Books must be published between 1 July 2019 and 30 June 2021.
  3. Submissions, non-fiction and fiction, must have been written in the English language.
  4. Books published in the UK, Ireland, USA and the Commonwealth are eligible for the Samuel Pepys Award.
  5. The judges of the Samuel Pepys Award reserve the right to call in books.
  6. The Samuel Pepys Award will be presented at the annual dinner of the Samuel Pepys Club in London on Tuesday 16 November 2021.

Judges

The judges of the tenth Samuel Pepys Award are:

  • Eamon Duffy is Emeritus Professor of the History of Christianity at Cambridge and the author of numerous books including The Stripping of the Altars and Saints and Sinners, a history of the Popes
  • Sir David Latham is the son of Robert Latham, the editor of the Diary. He is a retired Lord Justice of Appeal and an Honorary Fellow of Royal Holloway College, University of London. He is the current Chairman of the Samuel Pepys Club
  • Robin O’Neill is a former British ambassador, read English at Cambridge and has a particular interest in diplomatic history and English literature in the seventeenth century
  • Caroline Sandwich read English at Cambridge and Middle Eastern politics at London. Has served on the Heritage Lottery Fund and the Historic Houses Association amongst others. Her work at her husband’s family house, Mapperton, has given her an interest in seventeenth century history.
  • Sir Keith Thomas is a Fellow of All Souls and a distinguished historian of the early modern world, whose publications include Religion and the Decline of Magic, and Man and the Natural World.

Submissions

Submissions should be made on the Samuel Pepys Submission Form 2021

Please post completed forms by 30 June 2021 to:

Professor William Pettigrew
4 Regent Street
Lancaster
Lancashire LA1 1SG

And post one copy of each submitted book to the following addresses by 30 June 2021

Professor Eamon Duffy
13 Gurney Way
Cambridge CB42 2ED

Sir David Latham
3 Manor Farm Close
Pimperne
Blandford
Dorset DT11 8XL

Robin O’Neill
4 Castle Street
Saffron Walden CB10 1BP

Caroline Sandwich
Mapperton
Beaminster
Dorset DT8 3NR

Sir Keith Thomas
The Broad Gate
Broad Street
Ludlow SY8 1NJ

 

 

Wooden ballot box, Smithsonian Museum

Elections to RHS Council, 2021: nominations invited

The Royal Historical Society seeks the election of three Councillors in 2021 to replace serving RHS Council members who are stepping down in November this year.

Nominations for candidates for election are now invited. The closing date for nominations is Friday 16 July 2021.

PLEASE NOTE: Candidates seeking nomination for the Council Election, and all supporters, must be existing Fellows of the Royal Historical Society.

 

In accordance with By-law XXI, Fellows of the Royal Historical Society are invited to nominate for election Fellows willing to serve as Councillors for a term of four years commencing December 2021. Nominations must be supported by one Proposer and four Seconders, who are Ordinary, Retired or Emeritus Fellows of the Society. The Society desires that the membership of its Council be fully representative of the community of historians in the United Kingdom.

Please see the Society’s website for the institutional affiliations and subject expertise of current Members of Council: http://royalhistsoc.org/about/council-members/.

Those elected become trustees of the Royal Historical Society. Councillors are expected to attend all or most of the five annual Council meetings, to attend at least one of the Society’s regional visits or symposia, to serve on one or more committee and to assist the Society in other ways as needed. Council and most committee meetings are held on Fridays at the Society’s office in London, though are currently taking place online. Expenses for economy travel and accommodation are reimbursed by the Society.

The Councillors retiring in November 2021 are: Professor Oleg Benesch, Professor Clare Griffiths and Professor Paul Readman.

To Submit a Nomination for Election

Nominations should be made via the RHS Applications Portal: https://royalhistorical.smapply.io/ (selecting the ‘Elections to Council’ option).

Fellows wishing to stand for election are required to submit a short statement, and then to contact one Proposer and four Seconders via the Application Portal. Proposers in turn submit their supporting statement, and Seconders their electronic signature, via the Portal.

Completed nominations are then submitted by the Fellow who wishes to stand for election.

Closing date for nominations is: 11.59PM on Friday 16 July 2021.The election period will begin soon after the closing date, with further details circulated at that time. Results of the election are expected in early September 2021.

 

IMAGE HEADER: Wooden ballot box used in the northeastern United States c.1870. Smithsonian Museum. Public Domain.

 

RHS Awards 2021: winners and runners-up announced

Via a video ceremony on Friday 23 July, the Royal Historical Society announced its Publication, Teaching and Fellowship Awards for 2021.

The ceremony also included the Society’s joint fellowships with the Institute of Historical Research, along with the annual IHR prizes.

The RHS Awards are an opportunity to recognise and celebrate just some of the excellent work in research, publishing and teaching undertaken by historians in 2020-21. It’s also a chance to thank all those who’ve contributed to historical understanding through research, writing and teaching — in very challenging circumstances — during 2020-21.

 

AWARD CEREMONY VIDEO

The 2021 Awards ceremony is available to watch here.

 

2021 WINNERS AND RUNNERS-UP: IN FULL

Full details of all the 2021 Awards, their winners, runners-up and judges’ citations are available here.

 

ABOUT THE RHS AND IHR AWARDS

The RHS Awards include prizes for first journal articles (the David Berry and Alexander Prizes); first monographs (the Gladstone and Whitfield Prizes); outstanding Master’s dissertations (the Rees Davies Prize, named for one of Society’s former Presidents); and excellence in university teaching of History (the Jinty Nelson and RHS Innovation Awards, the former named for the Society’s first female President).

The Awards also include the annual prizes of the Institute of Historical Research: the Pollard and Neale Prizes (for best seminar paper and essay on early modern Britain, respectively); and the RHS / IHR Centenary and Marshall Fellowships to support doctoral research in History — the latter generously funded by Professor P.J. Marshall, another former RHS President).

Thank you to everyone who took submitted entries to this year’s awards and to our judges from with the RHS, IHR and universities across the UK.

Thanks also to all who contributed to the video — especially our host for the evening, Dr Andrew Smith (University of Chichester and RHS Hon. Director of Communications), and our video editor, Amelia Lampitt.

 

 

 

 

RHS Awards 2021: winners and runners-up announced

Via a video ceremony on Friday 23 July, the Royal Historical Society announced its Publication, Teaching and Fellowship Awards for 2021.

The ceremony also included the Society’s joint fellowships with the Institute of Historical Research, along with the annual IHR prizes.

The RHS Awards are an opportunity to recognise and celebrate just some of the excellent work in research, publishing and teaching undertaken by historians in 2020-21. It’s also a chance to thank all those who’ve contributed to historical understanding through research, writing and teaching — in very challenging circumstances — during 2020-21.

 

AWARD CEREMONY VIDEO

The 2021 Awards ceremony is available to watch here.

 

2021 WINNERS AND RUNNERS-UP: IN FULL

Full details of all the 2021 Awards, their winners, runners-up and judges’ citations are available here.

 

ABOUT THE RHS AWARDS

The RHS Awards include prizes for first journal articles (the David Berry and Alexander Prizes); first monographs (the Gladstone and Whitfield Prizes); outstanding Master’s dissertations (the Rees Davies Prize, named for one of Society’s former Presidents); and excellence in university teaching of History (the Jinty Nelson and RHS Innovation Awards, the former named for the Society’s first female President).

The Awards also include the annual prizes of the Institute of Historical Research: the Pollard and Neale Prizes (for best seminar paper and essay on early modern Britain, respectively); and the RHS / IHR Centenary and Marshall Fellowships to support doctoral research in History — the latter generously funded by Professor P.J. Marshall, another former RHS President).

Thank you to everyone who took submitted entries to this year’s awards and to our judges from with the RHS, IHR and universities across the UK.

Thanks also to all who contributed to the video — especially our host for the evening, Dr Andrew Smith (University of Chichester and RHS Hon. Director of Communications), and our video editor, Amelia Lampitt.

 

Dr Jonathan Saha — RHS Lecture, 24 September 2021

University of Leeds collection: Elephants and Empire

‘Accumulations and Cascades:

On the Ecological Impact of British Imperialism’

 

Dr Jonathan Saha (Durham University)

 

Friday 24 September 2021

17.30 BST – Live online via Zoom

 

Booking for this event now available via Eventbrite.

A Zoom link will be sent to all registered attendees on Thursday 23 September 2021

 

Abstract

What effect did British imperialism in Myanmar during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries have on frogs? And given that the lives of these small amphibian creatures were rarely ever recorded or preserved in archival collections, how might we find out? Sceptical readers may also wish to take a step back and ask, why should historians even care about their lives? These are unusual questions for a historian to confront, but they occasioned by the deepening conversation between ecology and history.

In this lecture, Jonathan Saha delves into the ecological impact of colonial rule in Myanmar. Though this, he argues that the concepts of ‘accumulation’ and ‘cascade’ are useful for enabling historians to narrate the impact of imperialism on the lives of animals, including humans.

 

Speaker biography

Jonathan Saha is Associate Professor of History at the University of Durham researching colonial Myanmar. His first book, Law, Disorder and the Colonial State (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013), explored the history of corruption in the colony during the late nineteenth century.

Jonathan’s forthcoming book, Colonizing Animals: Interspecies Empire in Myanmar (Cambridge University Press, 2022), examines how animals shaped imperialism while having their own lives irrevocably transformed by the advent of colonialism. In addition, he has published a host of articles, including in Past & Present and the American Historical Review, on a range of other topics, such as law, mental illness, crime, and masculinity. He is co-chair of the Royal Historical Society’s Race, Equality and Ethnicity Working Group and one of the authors of its 2018 report.

Booking for this event now available via Eventbrite.
A Zoom link will be sent to all registered attendees on Thursday 23 September 2021

 

RHS Lecture and Events: Full Programme for 2021 >

 

 

RHS Whitfield Book Prize, 2021 shortlist announced

The six shortlisted titles for this year’s RHS Whitfield Prize have been announced. The Prize offers £1,000 to the author of a work of British or Irish history.

The 2021 shortlist recognises the scholarly contribution and quality of six excellent history monographs published in 2020.

 

  • England’s Northern Frontier: Conflict and Local Society in the Fifteenth-Century Scottish Marches  by Jackson W. Armstrong (Cambridge University Press)
  • History and the Written Word: Documents, Literacy, and Language in the Age of the Angevins  by Henry Bainton (University of Pennsylvania Press)
  • Masculinity and Danger on the Eighteenth-Century Grand Tour by Sarah Goldsmith (University of London Press)
  • The Intelligence War against the IRA  by Thomas Leahy (Cambridge University Press)
  • Irish Women and the Great War  by Fionnuala Walsh  (Cambridge University Press)
  • The Making of an Imperial Polity: Civility and America in the Jacobean Metropolis  by Lauren Working (Cambridge University Press)

 

Once again, the Whitfield Prize competition attracted a large number of excellent entries, presenting the judges with something of an embarrassment of riches. Engagingly written, compellingly argued and deeply researched, the six shortlisted books demonstrate the vibrancy and intellectual ambition of today’s work on British and Irish history.

 – Professor Paul Readman, Whitfield Prize Committee Chair

 

The winner of the 2021 RHS Whitfield Prize will be announced in July, together with the winner of the RHS Gladstone Prize 2021, for a first book not primarily related to the history of Britain and Ireland.

About the RHS Whitfield Prize and its previous winners, 1977-2020.

 

New RHS Fellows & Members – elected in May 2021

At its meeting on 7 May 2021 the RHS Council elected 99 Fellows, 42 Members, and 72 Early Career Members, a total of 213 people newly associated with the Society.

The majority of the new Fellows hold academic appointments at universities, specializing in a very wide range of fields; but also include broadcasters, curators, publishers and academic librarians. The new Members also have a wide variety of historical interests, including those employed in universities, and as school teachers, archivists, museum staff – together with independent and community historians.

All those newly elected to the Fellowship and Membership bring a valuable range of expertise and experience that will help the Society to fulfil its objective of representing the diverse body of those engaged in historical scholarship.

New Fellows and Members are elected at regular intervals through the year. The current application round is open and runs to Monday 16 August 2021. Further details on RHS Fellowship and Membership categories, the benefits of membership, deadlines for applications in 2021, and how to apply, are available here.

Fellowship

  • Nicholas Amor
  • Julie Anderson
  • Geoff Andrews
  • Catharine Arnold
  • Karen Bartlett
  • Alison Baxter
  • Carol Beardmore
  • Adam Begley
  • Sheila Blackburn
  • Tracy Borman
  • Stuart Bradley
  • Tancred Bradshaw
  • Emily Bridger
  • Ting Chang
  • Natalya Chernyshova
  • Jessica Cox
  • Eugene Coyle
  • Malcolm Craig
  • Emily Cuming
  • Luke Daly-Groves
  • Gillian Darley
  • Matthew D’Auria
  • Saul David
  • Albert Warren Dockter
  • Patricia Fara
  • Alison Fell
  • Austin Fisher
  • Tanya Fitzgerald
  • Judith Flanders
  • Roy Flechner
  • Peter Galloway
  • Erika Graham-Goering
  • Annie Gray
  • Thomas Green
  • Georgina Green
  • Eilish Gregory
  • Onni Gust
  • Lawrence Hatter
  • Sean Heath
  • Matthew Hefferan
  • Stephen Hodkinson
  • Tom Holland
  • Catherine Holmes
  • Joseph Hone
  • Katja Hoyer
  • Cathy Hunt
  • Claire Jowitt
  • Josephine Kane
  • Matthew Kerry
  • Jagjeet Lally
  • Charles Lawrence
  • Alexander Lee
  • Andrew Lycett
  • Giles MacDonogh
  • Iain MacGregor
  • Manon Mathias
  • Matthew Lynn McDowell
  • Amanda McVitty
  • Hilary Morris
  • Conor Morrissey
  • John Moyle
  • Emilie Murphy
  • Julianne Nyhan
  • Marius Ostrowski
  • Richard Ovenden
  • Ilan Pappe
  • Sami Pinarbasi
  • Christopher Powell
  • Janina Ramirez
  • Helen Rappaport
  • L. M. Ratnapalan
  • Jeremy Rich
  • Jane Ridley
  • Jane Robinson
  • James Rodgers
  • Rochelle Rowe
  • Tim Satterthwaite
  • Max Skjönsberg
  • Angel Smith
  • Francis Spufford
  • Paul Stock
  • Trevor Stone
  • Julie-Marie Strange
  • Zoe Strimpel
  • Liam Temple
  • Mark Thompson
  • Jacqui Turner
  • Maiken Umbach
  • Patrick Wallis
  • Sarah Ward Clavier
  • Sethina Watson
  • Clive Webb
  • Julie Wheelwright
  • Sue Wilkes
  • Sarah Wise
  • Christian Wolmar
  • John Wood
  • Julian Woodford
  • Barbara Zanchetta

Membership

  • Albab Akanda
  • Rob Albery
  • Abigail Ballantyne
  • Donald Bissett
  • Joseph Black
  • Philip Booth
  • Michael Carter-Sinclair
  • Alison J. Clarke
  • Marian Gwyn
  • Mark Hillier
  • Christopher Hollings
  • Chloe Ireton
  • David Isserman
  • Ellis Keeber
  • David Kohnen
  • David Lane
  • Montgomery Lord
  • Lewis Maclean
  • Gaby Mahlberg
  • Jean McLean
  • Daniel McLean
  • Joshua McMullan
  • Tony Meacham
  • Ouassila Mebarek
  • Amanda Payne
  • James Perry
  • George Regkoukos
  • Andrew Richardson
  • Morgan Robinson
  • Husain Roussel
  • John Seriot
  • Jennifer Shaver
  • Aaron Skepple
  • Neil Smith
  • Haig Smith
  • Shantel Smith
  • David Snape
  • Uwe Phillip Strauss
  • James Strong
  • Terry Tastard
  • Rachael Whitbread
  • Mengzhen Yue

Early Career Membership

  • Aaron Ackerley
  • Daniel Adamson
  • Dewi Alter
  • Lee Arnott
  • Christopher Bahl
  • Jonathan Best
  • Priyank Bharati
  • Mattin Biglari
  • Gregory Billam
  • Gabriele Bonomelli
  • Christopher Booth
  • Joseph Buscemi
  • Matthew Coulter
  • Adam Curry
  • Joseph da Costa
  • Alison Daniell
  • Katherine Davies
  • Amanda Davis
  • Christopher Day
  • Shannon Devlin
  • Jacob Dyble
  • Christina Faraday
  • Desmond Felix
  • Holly Fletcher
  • Arielle Flodrops
  • Poppy Freeman-Cuerden
  • Ben Fuggle
  • James Gallacher
  • Jeremiah Garsha
  • Annabelle Gilmore
  • Milo Gough
  • Tarryn Gourley
  • Jacqueline Grainger
  • Heather Hind
  • Tehreem Husain
  • Charlotte Kelsted
  • William Lewis
  • Mark Liebenrood
  • Andrea Mancini
  • Emma Mavin
  • Tara McConnell
  • Lisa McLaughlin
  • Pietro Mocchi
  • Rawan Mohamed
  • Javan Mokebo
  • Carlo Moll
  • Monica O’Brien
  • Carlie Pendleton
  • Anna Reeve
  • MitchellRobertson
  • Euan McCartney Robson
  • Cora Salkovskis
  • Adam Sammut
  • Krishna Sharma
  • Christine Slobogin
  • James Smith
  • Amy Smith
  • Joshua Smith
  • Dave Steele
  • GabrielleStorey
  • Sato Takanobu
  • Hannah Telling
  • Charlotte Tomlinson
  • Alex Traves
  • Jonathan Triffitt
  • Aimee Walsh
  • Bethany White
  • James Wilson
  • Jingyue Wu
  • Kimberly Yancheson
  • Silvia Zago
  • Ally Zlatar

 

RHS Gladstone Prize logo

RHS Gladstone Book Prize, 2021 shortlist announced

The eight shortlisted titles for this year’s RHS Gladstone Prize have been announced. The Prize offers £1,000 to the author of a first work not primarily related to British or Irish history.

The 2021 shortlist recognises the scholarly contribution and quality of eight excellent history monographs published in 2020.

 

  • Princely Power in Late Medieval France: Jeanne de Penthièvre and the War for Brittany  by Erika Graham-Goering (Cambridge University Press)
  • A Commerce of Knowledge: Trade, Religion, and Scholarship between England and the Ottoman Empire, 1600-1760  by Simon Mills (Oxford University Press)
  • Revolutionary Pasts: Communist Internationalism in Colonial India  by Ali Raza (Cambridge University Press)
  • The Purchase of the Past: Collecting Culture in Post-Revolutionary Paris, c.1790–1890  by Tom Stammers (Cambridge University Press)
  • Local Lives, Parallel Histories: Villagers and Everyday Life in the Divided Germany  by Marcel Thomas (Oxford University Press)
  • The Origins of the British Empire in Asia, 1600–1750  by David Veevers (Oxford University Press)
  • On Hospitals: Welfare, Law, and Christianity in Western Europe, 400-1320  by Sethina Watson (Oxford University Press)
  • Ishikawa Sanshirō’s Geographical Imagination  by Nadine Willems (Leiden University Press)

 

This year, as in past competitions, the Gladstone Prize has attracted an outstanding range of submissions on the Atlantic World, British imperial, and trans-national contexts. The field was so strong that the committee shortlisted eight first monographs, in recognition of their originality, rigorous research, and vigorous contribution to past and current debates

 – Professor Barbara Bombi, Gladstone Prize Committee Chair

 

The winner of the 2021 RHS Gladstone Prize will be announced in July, together with the winner of the RHS Whitfield Prize 2021, for a first book in the field of British and Irish history.

About the RHS Gladstone Prize and its previous winners, 1997-2000.